Parent-Teacher Conferences – An Ego Boost – No, It’s a Tool

Parent-Teacher Conferences – A parenting tool in disguise!

Parent-Teacher Conferences, Ego Boost or Parenting Tool?

It’s time for Parent-Teacher Conferences!   I feel like I’ve always been an active parent when it comes to my kids education. However, I am not one to sign up for tons of volunteering or to be a field trip chaperon, or even take part in after school fundraisers. It’s just not me. I don’t even do in school fundraising because I hate how they put kids against each other to raise so much money or sell so many items so they can get a “prize”. If they are fundraising for the fact of fundraising, then I’m all for it but I will not beg friends and family to buy a product so that the school gets a mediocre dollar amount and my kid walks away with a piece of plastic I could have purchased at a dollar store.

Putting that aside, I am always asking my kids questions about school. I am always checking online to see what their grades are. I am always checking emails for homework updates and testing notifications. I am always there to help with homework and I always have my own dad on standby if I can’t figure out the math problem of the night. I suck at math so it’s good to have a back up handy for subjects you just don’t get, like I do with math. I am also there when my child has issues that I need to tend to. Like when my daughter was called a “sir” by a teacher based off of what she looked like and wore to school. Or when she was kicked and pushed down by a fellow student, I was there making sure she was ok, although I am not sure I like the outcome of that one, but I was still there for my daughter. Or like the time when my oldest was being bullied. I was there for that too. So of course when it comes time for parent-teacher conferences, even though I am fully aware of their grades and their current status, I always go. I realized a while ago that the only reason I go is to get confirmation that I am doing something right with my kids and their education. Hearing their teachers say nothing but good things about them all, gives me an ego boost. It gives me the confidence in myself and my role as a parent.

When they tell me that my children are “model students”, I smile. When they tell me that Scott is confident, is just naturally smart, witty, and has a awesomely sarcastic sense of humor, I smile. When they tell me that Alyssa doesn’t do a lot of talking in class but when ever she is called upon, she knows the answers and that she is always so neat, on time with handing in assignments and is always so calm and positive. I smile. When they tell me that Gianna is such a pleasure to have in class, has a very unique and friendly way about her and that she is super chill and so much fun, again, I smile. You see, I know all of these things about my children, but it’s nice to hear that from someone else other than your family and close friends. It’s nice to hear positive things about your children from people who spend 75% of their day with them. The only reason I have my kids go with to parent-teacher conferences is also to pump them up. If they know on an individual basis that they are acknowledged for being great all-around people who are all individually intelligent and each have unique traits, the more they will want to keep up that momentum. They don’t want to disappoint their teachers or their parents so by them hearing their teachers tell me that they are all exactly who I have known them to be, they smile with pride.

It isn’t meant to be conceited or egotistical, but to be used as a tool to help continue to push them to do more, do better, and be better. It helps to drive them to reach more personal goals. It helps me to know who my children are spending so much time with everyday. And, it todays world, it helps to know who my children are practicing lock-down drills with. It helps me to know who their favorite teachers are and which ones they don’t think very highly of. So even though I am in and out and while most would think it’s a waste of time for the teachers or for myself, I have to disagree. I appreciate each and every teacher that my children work with on a daily basis. I appreciate them taking the time out of their day to meet with me at parent-teacher conferences even though we all know they are doing well. I appreciate the kind words that are said about my kids and their educational skills and goals. I appreciate their hard work to teach on a daily basis. I appreciate my kids for always being the best that they can be, even with outside influences. I appreciate that my kids want to learn and take school seriously. I appreciate that they all take my “school is your one and only job so you better make sure you do your job the best that you can at all times” to heart. I am grateful that I have been blessed with three amazing kids and that I have been able to stay at home with them for as long as I have been. I am so grateful to learn by going to these conferences, that I am a good parent and I am raising three well-rounded individuals that will without a doubt bring a unique change to this world in which we live in.